Han Dago and the Millennium Falconi: “Star Wars The Force Awakens” and cultural diversity

A day or so after seeing Star Wars: The Force Awakens, a friend who had just watched it messaged me the following: “Did you like Han Dago?”. It took me a moment to realise what she meant. Then I replied, “I hope he ends up flying the Millenium Falconi“.

Apologies to sensitive readers, but it’s a thing we do. In fact, it’s a thing many of us from non-Anglo backgrounds do. And we do it with gusto. We do it to claim our space. And my friend knows I’m a proud wog-boy (dago, for our North American  cousins), and knows I always appreciate non-Anglo casting, so she was keen to see what I thought of Oscar Isaac.

Now while I probably wouldn’t turn for Oscar (he’s no Don Hany – Google that fine Lebanese/French/Australian), I do love his work. The brilliant David Simon/HBO series “Show Me A Hero” and the film J C Chandor’s “A Most Violent Year” were both heavily fueled by his powerful performances. Even subtler turns, such as in “Ex Machina”, are a pleasure to watch. He’s an actor who’s hard to take your eyes off. And, hey, he’s a good Guatemalan boy with big eyebrows and a wonderful mix of machismo (it comes from the Spanish, after all) and openness. Why wouldn’t I love Han Dago?

My friend started a thought process which, I’m embarrassed to say, I hadn’t considered before: Star Wars: The Force Awakens is not only the most culturally diverse movie of the “Star Wars” franchise, it’s quite possibly (outside of Fast and Furious 7 – which is brilliant, by the way) the most diverse major motion picture to come out of a major Hollywood studio in years. Here’s why that matters… Continue reading

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